"The Cosmopolitan and Gwyn & Campbell, both carbines were essentially obsolete from the start"
--Thomas B. Rentschler, Cosmopolitan and Gwyn & Campbell Carbines in the Civil War: A Definitive Illustrated History of Two Rare and Unusual Civil War Cavalry Carbines and their Use in the Field, p. 78

​"Burnside's gun earned a distinguished military reputation, even if its inventor did not." ​​
-- Roger Pauly Firearms:  The Life Story of A Technology, p. 93​

 ARTIFACT AND PHOTO: NATIONAL FIREARMS MUSEUM



Model 1862

ARTIFACT AND PHOTO:  CINCINNATI MUSEUM CENTER

​Gwyn & Campbell Model 1863                       

Model 1863

​New Model 1863

“The Spencer Carbine was issued to the Regiment. The best Cavalry Arm up to this Time it was a Stock Loading Gun a 7 Shooter easy to Fire on Horseback and could be Loaded or Charged while in Motion, even on a Gallop after a little Practice. We now for the first time felt properly armed and were More willing to Face the Foe”

​--Josiah Conzett, Company E, 5th Iowa Cavalry​

“I consider it the most superior small arm I have ever seen”

​--2nd Liet. A. B. Chapman of the 1st Dragoons, Commanding Company K, February 10, 1858, Sharps Carbines: Official Certificate of Value by Officers of the Army (document recopied on p. 35 of Martin Rywell’s The Gun that Shaped American Destiny)​

Please click on the name of each gun to find out more.

Four Carbines used
                   in the Civil War

   ARTIFACT AND PHOTO: NATIONAL FIREARMS MUSEUM

 

 

     ARTIFACT AND  PHOTO: NATIONAL FIREARMS MUSEUM